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ORIGINAL FRENCH ARTICLE: C’est dit

by Maurice Ulrich’s Daily Ticket

He Said It

Translated Wednesday 28 October 2009, by Henry Crapo and reviewed by Henry Crapo

Now at last we have it straight.

"Just where is François Bayrou?" one asks from time to time, with a passing feeling of disorientation. Not often, but at times, "Where is François Bayrou?"

He replied this weekend: "We are the center." Sure. But what sort of center? Big, small, a center extending to its border, leaning to one side, or slipping to the other? No, the center. Let that be. Logically, a point, or a navel.

This is the starting point for those very helpful clarifications, from one who wishes to construct a project "distinguishing itself clearly from both capitalists and socialists". He continues, "I will never say that I am on the Left, but I want people to understand that I am the one best able to defend a portion of their ideals."

Only one part, and which one? As to the question of distinguishing himself from both capitalists and socialists, it’s hard to grasp the parking place he has in mind.

Of what economy does he dream, this François Bayrou who seems to believe that the truth lies elsewhere? Swapping of goods and services? Communism? Or something completely different?

But, on the whole, if we follow his thinking, the center, to him, would resemble that rare work in the imaginary museum of Alphonse Allais [1], next to the mortuary mask of the infant Voltaire, the famous knife without a handle, from which one has removed the blade.

I say "resemble" because, despite all this, we have understood one thing: "I will never say that I am on the Left." That is said, and there, it is clear.

[1Alphonse Allais, photo from Wikipedia commons


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