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Editorial

ORIGINAL FRENCH ARTICLE: Un acharnement hystérique

by Dany Stive

Hysterical Determination

Un acharnement hystérique

Translated Friday 23 April 2010, by Alison Billington and reviewed by Henry Crapo

Dozens of police mobilized, helicopters hovering above the Lyon airport, several aeroplanes chartered for the transport of this one man ... there is something hysterical, which exceeds the logic of xenophobia and divisions of government in the furious determination which the State Machine has shown - and could show again- with regard to Guilherme Hauka Azanga. The means used by French administration to expel this father of an Angolan family pass all understanding. They are, alas, in their very excesses, an illustration of an evil immigration policy.

Nicolas Sarkozy has regularly reconfirmed the goal of "recovering mastery over the size of the immigration tide" ever since the discussion of the 2003 bill. To succeed in this, having set the statistics and the quotas for public offices and for their administration, he has closed his eyes to the human dramas that this policy causes. The drama of Guilherme Hauka Azanga is the umpteenth on a list that is just too long. This man has been living here for eight years, residing legally with his wife in France and they are the parents of two children who have been born here. His crime is to want to live peacefully as a family on French soil. But this man had the misfortune not have been ’chosen’ by the authorities to live to France. He is one of those immigrants whose arrival in France has been "let pass". He didn’t come to the territory by being assigned a certain job, for a time-limited stay subordinated to a contract of work. That he fled a country, Angola, which was ravaged by massacres, doesn’t enter into the intellectual considerations of our governing officers.

Could this expulsion policy be justified by economic necessities? Even putting aside all humane considerations, nobody has proved it. But above all, nobody can in all decency tolerate that the diversity of situations for undocumented immigrants be wiped out under the pressure of statistics and quotas. The existence of this man, if by mischance the French State succeeds in sending him back to Angola, would be irreparably shattered. His life is in France and nowhere else. That’s of what the men and women who took action for Guilherme and his family are persuaded. People who until today were ignorant of political, union or associative action. They were direct witnesses to the infamous political act initiated by Eric Besson. To see a father of a family, concerned for the education of his children and representing no danger to society, with police pistols aimed at him in front of their very eyes, a sight which both disgusted them and reassured them in their opposition. Their tenacity is doubtless a material element in the government’s furious determination. This resistance must be shattered and all vague desires to oppose must be discouraged.

Put aside the fact that migration is as old as humanity. Put aside the fact that it’s a question of a fundamental right that was solemnly confirmed in article 13 of the Universal Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1948. People must be able to circulate freely from one country to another. Parents of pupils, the neighbours of the Hauka Azanga family are the honour of our country. Just as the airline pilots who refused to transport a man who was bound and gagged, in their aeroplane. Parents of pupils, the neighbours of the Hauka Azanga family are the honour of our country.


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