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World

Strauss-Kahn: the case is dropped by judge

Translated Monday 29 August 2011, by Emily Drummond and reviewed by Bill Scoble

On Tuesday the American judge, Michael Obus, decided to drop the case for sexual assault against Dominique Strauss-Kahn. A decision made at the request of the prosecutor who had pointed out the lies in the accusations made by the New York Sofitel maid.

This judicial soap opera has cost “DSK” his position as Director General of the International Monetary Fund and has seriously undermined the likelihood of him realizing his French presidential aspirations.

The case is not over yet, as civil proceedings have still to take place. DSK managed to avoid a prison sentence, but he could still be found guilty and have to pay damages, as civil proceedings are independent and aimed at obtaining compensation. Such a trial would be “easier” for the alleged victim to win. In a criminal trial, the prosecutor must convince a jury into a unanimous decision that the defendant is guilty. Whereas, in a civil trial, the prosecution must provide more evidence than the defence in order to win.

Moreover, the prosecution in Paris has opened a preliminary investigation into the case of writer, Tristane Banon, who accused Dominique Strauss-Kahn of attempted rape in 2003.

And so it isn’t quite over, no matter what DSK’s friends, who are falling all over each other at the microphone, have to say about it. For Martine Aubry it is “a huge relief, we all expected that he would finally be able to emerge from this nightmare.” Bertrand Delanoe and Francois Hollande, even Jean-Francois Cope and Gerard Longuet are in agreement. The only discordant voice is that of Anne Mansouret, an elected socialist and mother of Tristane Banon, who declared herself to be “deeply indignant". "They are defending their friend; it’s one way of looking at politics, but it’s not the way I do."


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