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Society

ORIGINAL FRENCH ARTICLE: « Il y aura un avant et un après-procès du Carlton »

by Marie Barbier

“There will be a before and after Carlton trial”

Translated Wednesday 25 March 2015, by Adrian Jordan

In their pleadings, the civil parties, yesterday, saluted a trial which was a “work of public welfare”. Several, however, decided to abandon their suits against DSK.

Lille (Nord), special correspondent. After two weeks of debate, now comes the time for the pleadings in the Carlton trial, which will take place before the court in Lille until the end of the week. The lawyers for the fourteen accused of procurement will plead for the final three days of the week, after an indictment expected today.

Yesterday, it was the turn of the plaintiffs’ lawyers to speak, who commended the management of the extraordinary trial, “There will be a before and after Carlton trial”, assured Mr Emmanuel Daoud, lawyer for the Mouvement du nid. “Certainly, prostitution and procurement are not going to disappear. This evening, prostitutes will continue to walk the streets. This evening, business will continue to prosper for Dodo and his friends. But from now on, we will no longer look away.” “We took the gamble that this trial would be a work of public welfare”, continued Mr Daoud, for whom “the gamble paid off”, since the Senate finally placed the bill reinforcing the fight against the world of prostitution onto its agenda. “A law which will give us greater means to aid prostitutes to leave prostitution”, exulted the lawyer. All the defendants were present during the pleadings. These “gentlemen pimps”, as they were dubbed by Mr David Lepidi, lawyer for the Équipes d’action contre le proxénétisme (EACP) (Teams for Action Against Procurement), the chief of them Dominique Strauss-Kahn. “When I saw him enter this room, I had a vision, stated his colleague Mr Gilles Maton, counsel for the ex-prostitutes. It was the Minotaur by Picasso, the all powerful.” For the plaintiffs, DSK is certainly at the centre of the affair, which has an “odour of corruption - of people who want to be in good standing with the future president”, stated Mr Lepidi.

However, the lawsuits continue to crumble against the ex-president of the IMF, as several civil parties were forced by “a lack of sufficient evidence”, to withdraw their civil action against him. “Mr Strauss-Kahn, you may be acquitted, but many, many of us will not be fooled”, Mr Daoud warned him.

AN ORDEAL FOR THE EX-PROSTITUTES

At the other side of the bar, the ex-prostitutes are visibly moved. “It has been an ordeal for them”, sighed Mr Maton. “To hush the mouths of those who say they are only here for the money”, the four women demanded only one euro in damages and interest. After two weeks of very raw debate, this final week of the hearing also saw a poetic interlude, in the Muse vénale by Charles Baudelaire, recited by Mr Daoud:

“You must, to earn your evening bread
Like a choirboy, swing the censor
Chant Te Deums you scarce believe
Or, starving clown, display your charms
And your laughter filled with unseen tears
Give pleasure to the hoards”.


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