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Society

Children of immigrants still less well paid, housed and educated

Translated Friday 3 April 2015, by Adrian Jordan

Discrimination halts the economic integration of young people from immigrant families, particularly of African origin, according to a report published on Sunday.

Discrimination halts the economic integration of young people from immigrant families, particularly of African origin, according to a report published on Sunday. Among young workers under twenty-five years-old, the unemployment rate of African immigrant descendants reached 42% in 2012, against 22% for European immigrant descendants and “natives” (French youths with no migratory background). Typically, “young men of sub-Saharan origin have the most difficulties”, underlined Jean Pisani-Ferry, of France Stratégie, which carried out the report. Young descendants of immigrants also suffer from educational inequality (24% leave the educational system without qualifications, as opposed to 16% for others), unequal pay (the average household income for immigrants was 13,360 euros, against 20,310 euros for others in 2011) and housing inequality (33% of immigrants between 18 and 50 years-old live in public housing, compared to 13% of EU nationals).


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