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by l’humanité

Ankara bombing: the gory outcome of Erdogan’s policy

Translated Saturday 17 October 2015, by Anne Sanders

Saturday morning’s twin explosions not far from the central railway station in the Turkish capital transformed a tranquil scene, where men and women had gathered peacefully in response to a call from NGOs, unions and leftist parties, including the pro-Kurdish HDP party, into a battlefield of corpses and casualties.

Monday 12th October 2015

Three weeks away from the country’s crucial legislative elections, Turkey witnessed the most deadly attack in its history. On Saturday, in Ankara, between 97 and 128 people were killed in twin explosions during a peace rally organised by the pro-Kurdish party, the HDP, and its allies on the Turkish left.

They had come to ask for peace, but they were mown down in the street. On Saturday at 10am, in the vicinity of the central station in Ankara, during a rally organised by the Turkish left and the pro-Kurdish HDP party (the Democratic people’s party), at least 97 people were killed (128 according to Kurdish sources) and another 300 were wounded when two suicide-bombers detonated explosives strapped to their bodies. This rally calling for a return to peace between the conservative Islamic government and the rebels of the PKK (the militant Kurdistan workers’ party) was transformed into a field of horror.

No-one has claimed responsibility for the bombing. The government blames ISIS, but the opposition believes the government is behind it. Three weeks away from legislative elections which are crucial for the country, Erdogan has to face up to his responsibilities. Turkey’s ambiguous role in Syrian Kurdistan, and its willingness to pit the PKK against “Islamic State” [1], is leading to a state of chaos, over which the Turkish president perhaps no longer has any control.

[1Editor’s comment (HC): The Turkish government has not "pitted" the PKK against ISIS/Daesh. The Kurds have been effectively combatting ISIS, particularly in the determined recovery and defense of Kobané. The Turkish government, on the other hand, has been supporting ISIS, infiltrating them into Syria across the Turkish border, then pretending to attack them, and instead attacking the Kurds and PKK. There is indeed a state of "chaos", but that is precisely the aim of US, Israeli, and Turkish intervention, and is not something escaping the "control" of Turkey. Finally, one might well add that Erdogan’s rôle is not "ambiguous", but malevolent. These errors of judgement have not arisen in the process of translation. They are in the original French version of the article.

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